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Following the AV industry and professional USB audio visual.
Director of Operations for CRS. Also provides white papers and blogs on the web video conferencing industry. Over 20 years of Audio Visual experience. Joe graduated from Drexel University in Philadelphia, PA.

Review of Live Broadcasting Services

Review of Live Broadcasting Services

YouTube has recently entered the market of live streaming and online broadcasting, In addition to already being known as the most versatile online platform for streaming videos, YouTube is backed by its own infrastructure making it possible for them to offer all these services, completely free of charge, forcing other companies to think twice about their current price plans. In this article we are reviewing the top online live broadcasting services and the differences between these services. If your interested in using YouTube Live don't forget to check out our "Why YouTube LIve is BIG deal" post.

YouTube Live

Offering pretty much all the features which other services provide with no charges or obstructive advertisement is what YouTube does best. Where other companies would ask for money, YouTube has offered all of their services for completely free in an attempt to grow the Google network of services.

Let's simply take a look at the features that YouTube offers while comparing it to other services at the same time. However, before we begin, let's take a look at a common term in the market, "VH" or Viewer Hours, it's basically a number which denotes how many hours worth of bandwidth has been used and you'll see it used on nearly any premium streaming service.

Regardless of whether your viewers are watching your stream at HD or a lower quality, it counts towards the same number, 10 viewer hours can be anything from 10 viewers watching for an hour or 600 viewers watching for just a minute each.

LiveStream

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The Rise of the Soft Phone

The Rise of the Soft Phone

Audio endpoints are devices which are used by organizations for communications. USB audio end points are now considered soft phones which only require a USB connection to your computer and access to your favorite unified communications software. These include system phones with VoIP capabilities, microphones, speakers, headsets and so on. Large corporations use VoIP phones designed specifically for meeting rooms and can be connected to Lync servers now with professional level Skype for Business servers. These phones are also connected to a telephone service provider and are available through partnered resellers. But as technology changes, small and medium enterprises are looking for a more affordable solutions and thus the rise of USB soft phones is upon us.

Unified Communication solutions now range from USB headsets to dedicated USB soft phone devices for a 1/3 the third price traditional VoIP phone systems.

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Part 7- Summary

Part 7- Summary

 Summary: Any new camera purchased for a meeting room should provide native 1080p-30 resolution. 720p looks fine on the desktop but in meeting rooms, it simply doesn’t meet expectations. Select a camera with true optical zoom and with an optical zoom range that best meets your specific application. Take room measurements and check them against the graphics above to be sure. Digital zoom is not a useful feature for most applications. Presets are great for all cameras but after about Qty 6 you will likely see no additional benefit for most applications. USB 3.0 is the new standard for USB HD cameras. You must maintain USB 3.0 compliance throughout the connection including any extensions from camera port to and including PC port. Serial control is only necessary for certain applications. When you do need it, a miniDin8 connector or DB9 connector and VISCA protocol compliance is all you typically need to confirm for the camera and controller.

 

If you would like to see the industries latest USB cameras in action we host a Webinar Every Friday at 9AM PST and 12PM EST. Sign up here.

USB Camera Shootout

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Part 6 - Serial Control (e.g. RS232, RS485, VISCA):

Part 6 - Serial Control (e.g. RS232, RS485, VISCA):

 Serial Control (e.g. RS232, RS485, VISCA): Serial control allows remote PTZ, preset calling/setting and other control from 3rd party devices (e.g. joystick, Crestron) or software (e.g. RocoSoft) over a wired connection to the camera. Most meeting room users will be perfectly content with their infrared hand-held remote control, especially when all PTZ command are executed via preset calls.

However, some operators will require a better control interface for their application (e.g. Produced events with camera operator(s); Rooms with centralized touch-panel control systems, like Crestron/AMX/Extron, where all hand-held remotes have been removed from the room, etc…). Cameras with serial control capability will often conform to the industry standard mini-Din8 connector and Sony VISCA protocol. This makes using this feature fairly straightforward, as long as you have the right control cabling and set both the camera and controller to a matching baud rate, etc…

Serial Control for USB Cameras

Part 7- Summary

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Part 5- USB2.0 vs USB3.0

Part 5- USB2.0 vs USB3.0

USB 2.0 provides a bandwidth of 480 Mbps. USB 3.0 (aka “SuperSpeed”) provides 4.8 Gbps - or 10 times the bandwidth of USB 2.0. There are other differences between the two but this is the one that’s important to camera performance. This factor of magnitude level of improvement in bandwidth is beneficial for carrying 1080p-30 video from the camera to your PC. 1080p-30 at 24 bit color depth requires approximately 1.5 Gbps, which as you can see does not fit within the USB2.0 bandwidth and therefore video must be compressed by the camera itself before being sent over the USB connection. USB 3.0 allows the camera to send uncompressed video over the USB connection to the PC where the PC’s better equipped hardware and software can be brought to bear for better final compression performance over the web connection during a call. USB 3.0 does bring with it some restrictions. As with HDMI, this higher bandwidth requires different cabling than its predecessors.

USB 3.0 will only work with USB 3.0 ports on devices and with USB 3.0 cabling and extenders. Some USB 3.0 cameras are USB 2.0 “compatible”, which means that they have the capability to recognize a USB 2.0 port or cabling and downgrade to a low resolution video stream (e.g. 640x480, 1024x768, 720p-30- 16bit). In this case, you would probably be better off with a USB 2.0 camera. Happily, most modern laptops and PCs have been shipping with at least one USB 3.0 port for some time now. 

USB 2.0 vs USB 3.0 Cameras

Part 6 - Serial Control (e.g. RS232, RS485, VISCA):

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